I love my room right now

January 29, 2015

I should be grading papers this AM (what’s new), but I wanted to catch a moment before another group of students comes in.

I looked around my room while packing up yesterday afternoon/evening, and I thought, “I love my room, I need to get a picture of this”…alas, my phone was dead. So, here goes 1000 words instead of a picture.

First, my bike is in the room, which is cool, because I’ve been riding to work 2-3x/week. Yesterday it was slightly below freezing all the way in…and it felt great. Today it was 44 degrees F, and it was just gorgeous. Anyway…my room harbours vestiges of my other passions, namely teaching science.

Let’s begin with the white boards. On the front I see what’s left of a modified USGS resource allocation matrix. I didn’t like the old one I had on my computer, so I built one super quick in Excel while my students worked on a project about Natural Capital. On the large back board are dozens of population pyramids my students printed off while researching Less Economically Developed and More Economically Developed Countries. Next to that is a sketch up of a projectile device my students are going to design and build for our upcoming regional Science Olympiad tournament. Unfortunately, it looks a lot like a bong. Oh yeah, below the population pyramids are some sketched out notes about how restriction enzymes work (another Sci Oly thing).

Now…to the projects. The soothing sounds of water trickling down are behind me. One of my best students set up an aquaponics project for his senior Internal Assessment, and he brought it into the lab when he finished. I currently possess a 30 gallon goat trough with 30 gold fish and a pump, connected to a gravel filtration bed (.7 M above) currently containing Elodea (my improvisation). Eventually I’ll add a third chamber to grow some hardy plant. On the side bench, my first year students have their meal worm (T. molitor) growth experiments set up. They are measuring larval growth, time to pupation, and time between pupation and full metamorphosis to adult. They are really taking ownership of the project. Yesterday when they came in (after a week off), the came in, placed their back packs in the cubbies, got their lab notebooks, forceps, and rulers out with out me saying a word.

My desk…to call it organized chaos gives chaos a bad name. However, it’s got various piles of paper, a stack of books I’m using to cull IB Assessment statements, review resource management and “natural income” as well as re-learning electrical conductance in the heart and acid-base balance in the blood. I’d be remiss to leave out the Musical Ruler book a student brought me in response to having my 9th-10th graders playing the meter sticks in class (that’s a blog post in and of itself).

Shit, I almost forgot…we pulled apart the speaker where the announcements come raining down. One of my students (an engineer-to-be) is putting a switch and a potentiometer on it so we can turn the announcements down or off in the AM in order to grab 5-10 more minutes of class time. I’ve earned this autonomy by getting results (and again, that’s whole other story).

Suffice to say, I love spring. I’m starting to see my students take ownership of their studies, and they are beginning to make deep connections within the curricula I teach. I think they’re beginning to understand science.


money in mouths, and triage to treatment

January 13, 2015

Now that school is back in full swing my think time has been restricted, hoFirst-Responder-Triage-Tags-FRTT2-bawever, I have a surplus of creative energy that I’ve channeled into my classes. Hence, If I say, “I’m all about teaching and learning,” then I’m putting my (metaphorical) money where my mouth is. I am currently in the middle of the Higher Level human physiology for IB. Specifically, I’m teaching cardiovascular physiology. Fortunately, this is one of my “love units”, but unfortunately I haven’t taught it in about 5 years…in fact my notes were 9 years old…and none of my old material fits my new students. This dichotomy forced me to digest the IB Assessment statements, internalize them, and find an interesting and engaging way to teach them (see the previous post for my thoughts on “being in the moment”.

The new material I created led to a reorganization of my class blog, which continues the putting my money (time and energy) where my mouth is. I want my students to use the resources I generate and curate, therefre I should make my class blog as student-friendly as possible, right? With the exception of the daily grind, I turned all the chronological lists “backwards”, or most recent to furthest in the past. I can’t have those young fingers scrolling too much. Gawd forbid they put some effort in their studies. I’m kidding of course. I do want them to put in effort, but not towards finding an assignment. I would much rather them put effort into thinking about and responding to the assignment.

The second thing I’ve discovered this semester is how poorly prepared many of my students are for their IB and AP exams in May. I know I discussed this below, but I feel like I’m in triage mode this week and last week. I’ve devoted some class time with each section to triage…diagnosing what they remember from last year (their Junior year), and last semester. I can tell they have not reached that point of understanding where concepts connect and recall becomes easier. As we uncover this new material on cardiovascular physiology I’ll be re-teaching and reviewing basic cell biology, cell communication, and feedback loops. My goal is to get out of triage mode by the end of January so I can begin teaching forward and working to deepen my students’ understanding of biology. I consider this treatment as opposed to triage, with the result being mentally and physically healthy students ready to excel on their cumulative exams in May.


10,000 hours, expertise, and focused on what matters…part I

December 22, 2014
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Hey, lawdy mama. It’s the late, great, Junior Wells.

Have you ever thought about how bending a note on a harmonica and science education are similar? I think about it all the time. I distinctly remember playing at the 1048 Club in Montgomery over a decade ago, I was in the middle of a harmonica solo on a Junior Wells tune and I was thinking, “The only thing that matters right now is this note. If I don’t feel it, there’s no way the audience is going to feel it.” At that moment I realized how to truly live in a moment, and I learned how to make a tiny interaction a big deal. Friends of mine have called that “expert thinking”. I was well on my way to 10,000 hours of gigging and rehearsing, so according to Malcolm Gladwell, I was developing my expertise. I don’t think about that stuff occasionally, I think about it constantly. When I’m working with students one-on-one, or having a conversation with a small group, or presenting a concept to an entire class, I am working to live in the moment and working to make these tiny interactions a big deal.

In this series of posts, I will focus on three examples of my teaching, each at a different scale, and I will use these examples as justification for why I teach the way I do. I’ve spent the fall semester of 2014 focusing on the students I have in front of me, and I haven’t saved any energy to broadcast my ideas on-line. That may be counter cultural, but again, the little interactions I’ve had all year are a big deal, and I don’t really care about being the, “Next big thing” in education. That being said my class blog has been the recent repository for my ideas.

An inner conflict is brewing almost every time I am presenting to an entire class. I’ve got to be in my head, thinking about what matters, but I’ve also got to have a foot in the classroom, I’ve got to be in my students’ heads, otherwise I’m just talking, not teaching. This conflict has several iterations. The most prominent conflict is between the modern, dare I say, “watered down” pedagogy of, “Meet the students where they are,” and the harsh reality of, “This is the standard, and I expect you to rise to my level and learn this stuff.

Working one level down, a conflict arises between my responsibility and my students’ responsibility. I get to figure out what is essential for my students to know, and I get to figure out how to make these concepts meaningful, however, I also need to create some cognitive dissonance for my students so they have a reason to dig in and construct some understanding on their own. As my friend, Tammy Dunn says, “Great science teaching is front loaded as hell.” She means, “We plan like crazy so when we plant cognitive dissonance it is intentional. Just like a bent note within a solo is intentional so too are the methods I use in my classroom. With students however, I’m not using a melody to tell a story, I’m presenting a series of related ideas to deepen my students’ understanding of a concept.

Back to standards and to rising to my level. I’m currently teaching IB Biology (HL), and we finished our first higher level unit before Winter break. The standards, or Assessment Statements, for the higher level options are really tough. Not only are there a ton of them (check out my Weekly Learning Objectives, Week 17 for a taste), but they require lots of fundamental prerequisite knowledge. In short, to be successful at HL concepts, a student has to have learned something and, Gawd forbid, remember something, and even integrate several concepts. I digested the content, pun intended, built several graphic organizers, posted them to our class blog, and then brought the caffeine-fueled presentation/free-wheeling discussion I’m known for. My students were quite engaged during class, but very few of them…roughly 18% based on the exam grades…took the next step and made the deep connections between digestion and bioenergetics.

The exam results were frustrating, but they also revealed something about the teaching process. Something I have taken for granted, but something I need to be more aware of.  First off, my students weren’t prepared for my exam. What I mean is, they studied, but they didn’t push to make connections between the content pieces and think about the digestive system as a coordinated system adapted to assimilating nutrients to fuel our metabolism. I reinforced that idea multiple times, but it only got through to my top students. That’s a problem. The second thing I realized is my students still don’t trust their instincts, and they aren’t confident in their knowledge. You could argue this is a symptom stemming from the first problem (lack of preparation), but I think it’s more than that. I don’t think the majority my students have been trained to think for themselves, and the majority of my students are super uncomfortable when presented with new and interesting problems.

Given the information coming back from this exam, I have an exciting challenge before me, but I also have a conflict. I enjoy spending time and interacting with that 18% who rocked my exam and enjoyed the ambiguity of it. Those are my people. I can teach them at an extremely high level and push them to even greater understanding of biological systems. That’s not the point of teaching, though, is it? I need to create opportunities for the next 60% or so to meet me where I am. I’ve got to find a way for them to achieve my standards. That leaves about 22% out of the equation right? These are the students who are so far behind the IB standard that they won’t catch up. It doesn’t mean I don’t value them as people, but as students they’re not ready for this level of learning. Some day, maybe they will be. But they aren’t ready now, and it doesn’t make sense for me to sacrifice the time and energy of others to save the poorest performers. That statement goes against modern pedagogy…at least the stuff I get my my district…but I believe it to be true, and it will guide my practice as the 2nd semester unfolds.

In the next post I’ll discuss how I work with small groups of students. Again, I’m thinking about scale, living in the moment, and teaching with intentionality on different scales.


I promise I’m still “working”

September 17, 2014

Check this out https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=818772261476625&set=vb.100000315767225&type=2&theater

 

Had the pleasure of working with 20 middle school science teachers from jefferson county schools, in Jefferson County, Alabama (funny, that). The challenge was to drop a barbie doll 17.25 feet and get her as close as possible to the ground without having her head hit. They estimated the length of the bungee cord comprised of rubber bands based on a formula they derived from an experiment with only 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 rubber bands. Most impressive.


I love it when a “plan” comes together

August 12, 2014

Day 3 at IBI’ve said it time, and time again; however, my experience during first block today make this saying relevant again, “You can only plan so much, and great teaching occurs in the moment…between students and between students and a teacher (or teachers). “

Down here in Jefferson County, Alabama, we started school early. I mean real early. i mean we started with students last week early. The upside to an 8-week summer break is I get a two week jump on where I was last year and I get a four week jump on my competition up North and out West.

I’m using these extra two weeks to develop my classroom culture in a very deliberate way, and developing my students lab skills. So far, so good. I have emphasized “Style Points” (an idea I stole from my buddy John at the Arkansas School for Mathematics, Science and the Arts). To me “style points” means we will maintain a professional, productive, and purposeful demeanor in my classroom/laboratory. This starts with me, and I expect it (dare I say, demand it) from my students (so much that students must speak with correct grammar, they don’t slouch, they don’t talk with their chin on their hands…but I digress). Anyway, I’m developing a culture of professionalism, and I’m engaging my students in scientific endeavors from the very start. Check it out.

Yesterday I introduced scientific methodology, and today we had an opportunity to process the collected data, and on Thursday we will analyze the data. Doing science in small, thorough steps has captured my students’ interest and kept them engaged. I did not, however, plan — or expect — things to go as smoothly as they have. Yesterday we used PASCO probes to measure temperature at four places along the arm (I slid digiital data collection in already!), we aggregated the class data, and calculated the mean. Today (and this is all true) I taught students how to calculate standard deviation, what standard deviation meant, how to calculate variance, standard error, 95% Confidence Error, and I outlined what I expect from their graphs. On Thursday, they will bring in their graphs. I will help them write captions, and then we will construct scientific arguments using “my” model of Claims, Evidence, and Reasons. I could not have planned for things to work out so well. I can really only execute an idea and work with my students to bring it to fruition.

At the end of first period today, I sat down with my students  and outlined what we had done over the past two days, and where we were headed on Thursday. The outline on the board looks like this: ask a question, construct a hypothesis, collect data, process data, build graphs (visualize data), next…analyze data, construct argument (C. E. R).  What a beautiful start to the year.

I am telling my students we don’t do these things in a vacuum. These methods, this way of organizing our thinking will permeate everything we do this year. This is why I want to be in the classroom.


Check out these two quick videos

August 10, 2014

The 20 minutes you’ll see on the YouTube are necessary viewing. You can find them on the screen cast page: screen casts, or on the YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMO8klD8ZMI, https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4hwnUhc0pkQ


Summer time blues

June 11, 2014
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“ain’t no cure, y’all”

Back in 1995, when I started graduate school, I remember being really bummed out. It wasn’t just because I knew I would be living in Tuscaloosa, Alabama (I learned a valuable life skill during my time in T-town: if you can be happy in Tuscaloosa, you can be happy anywhere). Sure Tuscaloosa is a horrible place, but that’s not the point. The point is, the UA department of Biology had just built a new building complete with state-of-the-art labs, mesocosm space, offices, and conference rooms. I was worried I would blow it. What if I wasted the opportunity. I know that kind of thinking is completely worthless, but that kind of thinking comes completely natural to me.

It’s now 2014. It’s summer. I’ve got 6.5 weeks remaining, and I’ve got several opportunities on the horizon. Here’s the short version: I’m leading two workshops for middle school science teachers, I’m working with AP biology teachers for PASCO scientific, I’m helping edit some e-books, and I’m coauthoring a teachers manual for new and experienced AP Biology teachers. On top of all that, I’m supposed to help hire a director for the Cahaba Environmental Center. I also need to find some time to do quality planning for my classes, work out like I’m in my thirties again, paddle, play with my kids, and enjoy my yard.

Yep, I’m freaking out. Time to go for a bike ride.


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